Writer of Speculative Fiction and Masher of Notes for the Broken-Hearted

Tag: coronavirus

“The Horseman’s Dream” – A Speculative/Dystopian/Sci-Fi Novel

Circumstances have forced me into launching this novel before it strays from fiction into reality, which, as beta readers will know, has already happened to some extent (fascist government, technopropaganda, floods, corporatocracy, disease, quarantine, pharmaceutical/spiritual/psychological warfare etc.). Lately, we’re all being pushed further down the rabbit hole with Covid-19, Lockdown, QAnon, Epstein, Virtual Reality, Neuralink and 5G conspiracy theories, so I think it’s not such a bad time to put it out there.

So is it Sci-Fi, Dystopian, War, Adventure, Psychological Horror or what?

It’s all of those things. I always hoped that my big project might serve as a warning about where we’re headed politically, culturally and spiritually. The novel’s message aligns with the great William Blake’s line “A Horse misus’d upon the Road Calls to Heaven for Human blood” from his wonderful poem Auguries of Innocence.

Thank you to:

My parents, who have always supported my writing ambitions, albeit nervously, sometimes!
My Art and English teachers from secondary school, Alan Blain and Gary Hopkins, not only for their guidance on critical analysis and craftsmanship, but also for their moral support.
Reverend Ridley, my school chaplain who also gave me great inspiration for my writing.
My first boxing coach, Brett Jones, who sadly passed away a few years ago. The epitome of a gentle giant, he was a great influence in terms of weighing power and fighting spirit with kindness and responsibility.
All the truly investigative, independent journalists and whistleblowers sticking their necks out and fighting for truth.
My wonderful beta readers, some of whom have blamed me for recurring nightmares and altered states of consciousness! Sorry about that.

Here are a few words from those beta readers:

“One of the best books I’ve read in ages.”

“I really love the pace of it and it just completely sucked me in. Barely noticed where we were and that last line was so poignant.”

“I found the characters relatable and easily sympathised with. They’re very human and well thought out, also enjoyed some of the world building being left to the imagination. You gave us just the right amount of info without making it too prose heavy.”

“McCole was excellent. I really liked the hints at his past but obviously being a very closed off individual, he never disclosed it himself: it was down to the interpretation of the reader.”

“The story very much became mine.”

“Weirdest book I’ve ever read. Not normal.”

“I’ve not slept for a week.”

Ok, so it’s not for everyone. But if you’re broad of mind and hardy of psychological constitution, please give it a go. If you enjoy symbolism and esotericism, I believe you’ll get an extra kick out of it.

Check out my Twitter for updates.

Click here to find out more about the origins of The Horseman’s Dream.

Wishing everyone good health of mind and body during Corona Lockdown and hope you enjoy THE HORSEMAN’S DREAM. X

Click here to buy.

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Social Distancing: A Smaller Hell?

Covid-19 has already wrought widespread panic. Now, we must acclimatise to the idea that we might all be spending lonely periods of time indoors. We want to protect our vulnerable loved ones and, according to experts, social distancing is one of the most effective methods of achieving that.

As a writer, I spend most of my time alone at a desk, working on nightmarish visions of the United Kingdom such as The Horseman’s Dream – a 20-year-long project about flooding, VIP child abuse, quarantine and most importantly, a sinister government using technology and propaganda in psychological/spiritual warfare against its people. So, for someone like me, social distancing is not such a stretch.

Don’t forget that all the stories, poetry, Interactive Fiction and music streaming is free with no sign-up required.

With regard to the current crisis, please make good decisions. Don’t take unnecessary risks. From the bottom of my heart, I wish everyone the best of luck, but that’s only half the battle. Be smart. Make your own luck. Let’s be paranoid now and laugh about it later, rather than glib and dead/unable to laugh about anything ever again.

One of my favourite sayings is that poetry will save us all. If you’ll allow me to expand this to Netflix and e-books, I think I might be on to something.

Bunker down. Read. Learn an instrument or a new language. Play music. Don’t panic or you’ll make bad decisions. Supply good information and clear advice to the elderly and vulnerable. Make sure they can contact you in an emergency.

Lastly, don’t, under any circumstances, trust our so-called leaders to keep you or your loved ones safe. Forget The Horseman’s Dream, this is The Objectivist Eugenicist’s Wet Dream, which is why we currently have the hashtag #BorisTheButcher trending on social media.

Take care, good people. X

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Wirral: The Paradise Peninsula

Over The water. The Dark Side. The One-Eyed City.

The Wirral is a strange place: a peninsula onto which you venture, rather than into. Argue this one with the natives at your peril. Beautiful landscapes and Viking history make up as large a part of its identity as shipbuilding, promenades, pop music and now, (2020 edit) Coronavirus.

Curiously polarised by time, towns which appear sleepy and civilised by day become havens of hedonism by night. Despite (or maybe because of) living on three-quarters of an island within an island, escapism is a priority.  Some natives insist that they most certainly are keeping up with the Jones and everything is fine.  The good ones (of which there are many) just don’t care, but a conspicuous few, drunk on our narcissistic mainstream culture, act out their reality TV fantasies in public to terrifying effect. Sometimes, life on the Paradise Peninsula is downright surreal, almost as if its geography intensifies the drawbacks and benefits of small-town life. Like a magnifying glass to the merits and madness.

At 18, I was working in a local restaurant and fell in love with a waitress.  We started a relationship and suddenly, the princely local rugby players became a problem.  Every time they would leer at her or make a comment, I would have to keep my mouth shut and continue working.  Many was the wine glass cracked by rage polishing.

A few snotty rugger buggers is one thing, but a national/premier league footballer is quite another.  My girlfriend told me that he got her number from the management and phoned her up to offer private “football lessons”. I asked him if he’d like a private boxing lesson, which he declined. I lost my job, kept some dignity and never forgot that people will often choose to side with money/fame/power over doing what’s right.

This is just a small vignette of the sociopathy acted out by the self-appointed royalty of the Wirral.  The footballer’s entitled behaviour echoes archaic rights for the privileged, as per jus primae noctis.  More currently, it brings to mind austerity, the clampdown on our civil liberties, the hourly infringements on our privacy and many more bigger-picture problems that exist in Britain right now, courtesy of the elite classes who are terrified of the word meritocracy, but swear up and down that they believe in social mobility.

So, I wrote A Smaller Hell, examining small-town hierarchies through a department store in Birkenhead, representing the split-personality of the Wirral, and Dianne Doyle, the kind of person who would seek to exploit and perpetuate it for her own amusement.  I wanted my first novella to reflect my fear of how low people are willing to go when they’re rich and bored.  Dianne Doyle is an enigma: she’s something far worse than what she appears to be, but as Robert Louis Stevenson said, The Devil can sometimes do a very gentlemanly thing,

Having said all this, you can see why many call this the Paradise Peninsula. Most of the photographs below were taken on the southern coastline, but there are myriad beauty spots all over the Wirral.

https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Attractions-g1420760-Activities-c57-Wirral_Merseyside_England.html

Come and visit us soon, but don’t feed the footballers.

The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heav’n of hell, a hell of heav’n. – John Milton

 

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